Vyrso: My Selection of On Sale Books.

Book Cover of Ed Dobson's Seeing Through the FogVyrso is part of Faithlife, formerly known as Logos Bible Software. It provides e-books focused on general rather than professional/academic audiences. I occasionally browse the site to see if there are any deals worth taking advantage of and I found a few this time around I thought I’d share with you:

  • Ed Underwood. Reborn to Be Wild: Reviving Our Radical Pursuit of Jesus. David C. Cook. $0.99.
    • I don’t know anything about Underwood, but this line from Vyrso caught my eye, “A long-time pastor ponders why the Jesus Movement stopped moving …” This parallels my more general interest in what exactly happened to the hippies…
  • J.I. Packer, Paul Helm, Bruce Ware, Roger Olson, John Sanders. Perspectives on the Doctrine of God. B&H. $2.99.
    • I love these books that provide multiple views on a subject. Some really great authors attached to this particular volume. A number of other volumes are on sale in this series for a similar price, this is the one that most interested me.
  • Ed Dobson. Seeing Through the Fog: Hope When Your World Falls Apart. David C. Cook. $1.99.
    • Dobson recently passed away after a ten year battle with a debilitating and progressively worsening illness.
  • John C. Thomas and Lisa Sosin. Therapeutic Expedition: Equipping the Christian Counselor for the Journey. $2.99.
    • I’m not familiar with Thomas or Sosin, but their extensive experience and the practical nature of the book attracted my attention.
  • William Yount. Created to Learn: A Christian Teacher’s Introduction to Educational Psychology, 2nd edition. B&H. $0.99.




If You’re Hankerin’ to Start Fiddlin’… or Playin’ Any Stringed Instrument…

Photo of an Arkansas Fiddler

…Then I’d like to tell you about an online site where you can find quality stringed instruments at great prices!

I came across Michael Sanchez of superiorviolins.com several years ago, quite by accident.   I played violin decades ago and was considering trying to pick it up again.  For some reason I decided to google the difference between a fiddle and a violin.  I had been trained as a classical violinist, but had been wondering what it would be like to play the fiddle.  Quite honestly,  I thought a  fiddle was an entirely different instrument than a violin.  So, I turned to the ever-faithful search engine and plugged in “what is the difference between a fiddle and a violin?”  Up popped a young man with a somewhat impish grin who explained the difference – same instrument,  the difference is in how you play it.  I then looked up his website and in the years since have become a faithful follower and customer.  I thought I would do a review for Dave Enjoys, because it’s always good to exercise caution when making purchases online, especially major ones, and I can assure people they can shop with confidence at superiorviolins.com.

Superiorviolins.com is actually one of two sites run by Sanchez.  A sister site is violintutorpro.com which is an amazing site offering tremendous resources to violinists and fiddle players alike.  I will be reviewing that site in a later article here on Dave Enjoys.  But for now, I’d like to tell you about superiorviolins.com, which is the store part of the sister sites.  Here you can purchase violins (including electric violins), cellos, violas, bows, cases and a variety of accessories.  The instruments range from very basic, beginner type instruments for around $250 all the way up to master level instruments for $15,000.  Michael carefully selects the instruments he sells to ensure that they are of the highest quality, no matter the price.  I love that you can try any instrument in the comfort of your own home before you buy it.  The higher-priced instruments require a down payment, and if you decide not to purchase you simply return it, paying only the return shipping price.

I have tried out several violins from superiorviolins.com.   My absolute favorite was the Elda Marina, which retails for $3500.  I couldn’t believe how much easier it was to play than the inexpensive old violin I had picked up at a yard sale!  It sounded as though I had gained instantaneously ten years of practice, just because of the beautiful tone this instrument so effortlessly produced.  I took the Elda Marina to my local music store and tried it out against some of their high-end models.  None could compare with the Elda Marina with its rich tone.  Unfortunately, right at the time I was planning to purchase the violin of my dreams I got hit with some unexpected financial obligations and wasn’t able to …even with the great sale price and payment plan.  It just wasn’t the right time for me.   I cried like I was saying goodbye to a friend I might never see again when I closed the lid on it for the last time before packaging it to return!

Tia Bruna as found on SuperiorViolin.com
Tia Bruna as found on SuperiorViolin.com

Several months later things were looking better again financially and I decided at this time to try out another model; a less expensive but highly recommended one, the Tia Bruna.  This is a beautiful violin with rich, deep tones.  I made the purchase and I am so glad!  The decades I had turned my back on the violin are being reclaimed as I faithfully practice.  A good instrument can make such a difference, including providing increased motivation to practice.  It is difficult to struggle along on an inferior quality instrument…a quality instrument makes practicing a joy.  I highly recommend that parents provide their children with the highest quality instrument they can afford…and Michael makes sure he does everything he can to make his instruments affordable and available to people, including frequent and generous sales, contests, trade-ins and easy payment plans.   By the time I applied my trade-in and the $100 I won in a contest to a really great sale price I was able to purchase a truly wonderful violin almost for a song.

So, all that to say, if you are looking for a violin, viola or cello, be sure to check out superiorviolins.com….Michael Sanchez is as honest and trustworthy as they come and I guarantee you won’t be disappointed!

Height-Adjustable (Sit/Stand) Desks – 2014 Update.

Introduction

In November 2012 – two years ago – I wrote an article on height adjustable desks. It consisted of my research on the subject – what options were available, useful articles on the topic, etc. For the last two years I have used a standing desk – essentially a drafting table – for work. It is adjustable, but it requires loosening bolts and is fairly involved – so I rarely change its height. I’m still looking at height adjustable tables (of the crank or electric variety) and decided to update my original article.Image of adjustable height desk.

I know from personal experience and from reading various articles (cited in the bibliography at the end of this page) that standing all the time isn’t an option for most people (including myself). A standing desk may be better for my health, but it certainly doesn’t feel better for my knees.

If you are aware of additional adjustable height desks I have not included in this article, please let me know. I’m also always interested in reading any articles of real substance on the subject.

One site you’ll definitely want to visit during your purchasing process is Comfortable Computing. Be sure to check out their interactive tool “Workspace Planner” – it will help you decide what height you need your adjustable desk to be able to rise to. You might also want to visit JustStand which has a nifty calculator for determining how many calories per day you would burn from standing rather than sitting.

The Options

Multi Table

  • Features: hand crank, 27.5″ to 47″ height adjustment, 30 day return guarantee, 1 year warranty against defects, 5 years on steel.
  • ModTable  – $599 –  Available in various sizes, uses crank.
  • Mini Mod – $599 – A smaller version of the ModTable, but since pricing is the same, not sure why you would ever buy one…unless you had a very small workspace.
  • Mod-E –  $649 – An electric model instead of hand crank.
  • Also offers treadmill desks.

UpDesk

  • Features: electric lift mechanism, 26.5″ to 42.5″, 1.25″ high pressure laminate desktop, 300 lb. weight capacity, each leg has own motor, 20 min. setup, 5 yr. warranty.
    • PowerUp Small – 48″ x 30″ – $949
    • PowerUp Medium – 60″ x 30″ – $999
    • PowerUp Large – 72″ x 30″ – $1049
  • Features: manual lift mechanism, 26.5″ to 42.5″, 1.25″ high pressure laminate desktop, 225 lb. weight capacity, 5 turns per inch (precision), 20 min. setup, 5 yr. warranty.
    • CrankUp Small – 48″ x 30″ – $699
    • CrankUp Medium – 60″ x 30″ – $799
  • Also offers the SquaredUp line of desks (corner), UpWrite (surface can be written on with dry erase markers).
  • Offers a number of nice accessories as well.
  • S&H is $129 on electric, $99 on crank.

GeekDesk

  • Features: 335 lb. weight capacity, 4 programmable presets, each leg has own motor, 1.1″/sec. lift speed, 23″ to 48.75″, 2 yr (motor) / 5 yr (frame) warranty.
    • Max Large – 78.75″ x 31.5″ or 63″ x 31.5″ – $985
    • Max Small – 47.25″ x 31.5″ – $949
  • Features:28-35mm/sec. lift speed, 275 lb. weight capacity, 23″ to 48.75″, 2 yr (motor) / 5 yr (frame) warranty, each leg has own motor.
    • GeekDesk v3 Large – 78.75″ x 31.5″ or 63″ x 31.5″ – $799
    • GeekDesk v3 Small – 47.25″ x 31.5″ – $749

NextDesk

  • These guys are expensive. I think they are going for the “Apple” of height adjustable tables.
  • Features: 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee, 3 Year Warranty (depends on model, some come with 2 Year and the Fit with a limited lifetime).
  • Terra – 63″ x 31.5″ – $1497
  • Air – 63″ x 31.5″ – $2178
  • Solo – 30″ x 24″ – $897
  • Offers a number of other options including the Terra Pro, Air Pro, L Series (l-shaped desks), U Series (u shaped desks), solo (and plus), Up, Fit (w/treadmill), custom, and conference.
  • Suggests Bill Me Later, which allows for financing, brings costs down to around $50/mo. for the Terra.

LifeDesk

  • Features: 22″-48″,  275 lb. weight capacity, 1.1″/sec. lift speed.
  • Two-Leg Short Base – $1450.
  • One-Leg Electric Base – $988+.
  • Three-Leg Electric Frame – $2890.
  • A number of options, prices appear to have increased significantly since last time I updated this article, but so has the variety of options available.

VersaTables

  • Features: Lifetime warranty (on material defects), 30 day full refund return period, free shipping.
  • Deluxe Height Adjustable Computer Table – $359 – Height begins at 24″, a number of variations available. Appears to be a little difficult to adjust – not crank or electronic.
  • Edison Electric Table – $1199 – Electric height adjustment, up to 50″ tall, available in 36″, 48″, 60″, and 72″ widths.
  • Split Level Adjustable Computer Table – $499 – Available in various sizes, uses grommets for adjusting height.
  • Versa Center – $300 – Available in various sizes, doesn’t appear to use crank or electronic adjustment for height.
  • Adjustable Wall Mount Computer Station – $280 – This looks very interesting, but it concerns me that it appears to support only one monitor.
  • Deluxe Electric Life Wall Mount Computer – $700 – The name is a bit of a misnomer – it is a station, not the computer itself. Again, appears to only support one monitor.
  • Prices have increased significantly on a number of models (Edison from $899 to the present $1199). Not all prices have been updated (here); their hand adjustable crank model has been discontinued.

Safco

  • Offers a number of models, many are standing desks of fixed height. I like lots of leg room and these don’t have it, but some might like them – they have extra shelving.
  • Muv 28″ Adjustable Height Workstation – $448 – 29″ – 34″ height.
  • Muv 35″ Adjustable Height Workstation – $479 – 29″ – 34″ height.
  • Muv Stand-up Adjustable Height Workstation – $505 – 35″ – 49″ height.

ConSet

  • Starts around $1400 for a complete table, though you can also purchase just the bases for around $700. Has a decent variety of options including some wall-mount options. Site could use some improvement in navigability.

Workrite

  • This used to be listed under Idea at Work and linked to The Human Solution. I’ve updated to point directly to the Workrite site and have eliminated the previous entry due to Workrite discontinuing the Proliftix line.

Anthro Technology Furniture

  • Elevate II – 28″ – 47″, electric, $1300.
  • Elevate Adjusta – 27″ – 53″, electric, $2850.
  • Elevate Corner – 27″ – 53″, electric, $4930.
  • Elevate Wrap – 27″ – 53″, electric, $3100.
  • Elevate Single – 27″ – 53″, electric, $2380.
  • Fit Adjusta – Pricing starts at $829, only goes up to 31.25″.
  • Fit Console – Pricing starts at $1179, only goes up to 31.25″.
  • They’s also added a new line “Steve’s Station” with prices starting at $3249.

Evodesk

  • Features: has an expandable frame (can become wider as needed), can have a programmable controller (save height settings), electronic up/down.
  • Starts at $599 with a number of accessories available to customize the unit.

VariDesk

  • Offers units which fit on top of one’s existing desk. The Single (supports one monitor) starts at $275, at the higher end is the Pro Plus at $350 which supports dual monitors and has a keyboard lift.

Rebel Desk

  • Hand crank models for $599.

iMovR

  • ThermoDesk Elemental – $549 – hand crank.
  • ThermoDesk Ellure – $619 – hand crank.
  • ThermoDesk Electra – $829 – electronic.
  • Thermodesk Elite – $1099.

StandDesk

  • Features: 28″ to 45″ adjustable height; supports up to 225 lbs; top size is between 23.5″-40″ width and 49.5″-70″ length; choose between standard and deluxe memory control.
  • They have one base model, which costs $399 for the frame. Then one adds the top, laminate 30″x60″x1″ runs $110 while bamboo runs $180 for the same size, thus price for minimum configuration including top is $509.

Comparison Table

This is an apples-to-oranges comparison table, it demonstrates price ranges of the products and min/max heights, but doesn’t account for most other features.

(This is not an exhaustive comparison table)

Table Price Min Max Method
Safco Height-Adjustable Split Level $448 26″ 37.25″ Bolts
Stand Desk $509 28″ 45″ Electric
iMovr ThermoDesk Elemental $549 27.5″ 47″ Crank
MultiTable ModTable $549 27.5″ 47″ Crank
Evodesk $599 49.5″
Rebel Desk $599 28″ 48″ Crank
VertDesk $689 28″ 46.5″ Electric
ergodepot Jarvis $695 25.5″ 51″ Electric
Updesk CrankUp $699 26.5″ 42.5″ Crank
Uplift 900 $699 26.5″ 42.5″ Crank
ErgoTron $737 30.6 50.6″ Brake
GeekDesk v3 $749 23″ 48.75″ Electric
PowerUp $1049 25.5″ 50.5″ Electric
Edison Electric Table $1199 24″ 50″ Electric
Elevate II $1300 28″ 47″ Electric
Conset $1400 25″ 47″ Electric
LifeDesk $1450 22″ 48″ Electric
NextDesk Terra $1497  24″ 50.5″ Electric

Others

  • AFC Industries Inc. – Offers what looks like professional office furniture that is height adjustable.
  • Alvin Professional Table – Looks to be a drafting table, available via Walmart, it ranges from 29″ – 45″. May be a bit of a pain to adjust, but the price starts at $199.
  • Biomorph – Sells several different models beginning at $995.
  • Cotytech – Sells several adjustable height desks, including a laptop desk that can go up to 41.9″ and costs $264.
  • Dania Furniture – Offers a desk for $1100, adjusts up to 52″.
  • ergodepot – $695 is the current sale price, offers free S&H.
  • ErgoTron – Offers desk mounts, full desks, and mobile carts. The full desks start at $737.
  • Focal Upright.
  • Gilbraltar – Sells bases for adjustable height desks. Pricing appears reasonable ($400+/-) but only go up to 39.5″. Can be purchased through Kitchensource.
  • Haworth – Available through Crate and Barrel for $299. Very inexpensive, but see reviews on Crate and Barrel site for downsides. Also sells an electric table for $1390 available from Sit4Less.
  • Humanscale – Starts at around $1800 for their “Float” desk.
  • idealworkspace – Based out of Singapore.
  • ISE Group – Sells several different height adjustable tables, both crank and electric, but one has to order through VARs, thus no pricing.
  • Jesper Office – Their “value” desk starts at $1450.
  • KareProducts.
  • Maverick – Sells through VARs.
  • Mayline – Starts at $3000 for most height adjustable desks. The Soho Adjustable Mobile Computer Table is available from Walmart for $350 and goes from 14″ – 48″.
  • Pressfit Furniture – These are fixed height, cost around $399.
  • Right Angle Products – A variety of options, not clear on pricing.
  • Relax the Back – Offers the Sit to Stand Desk starting at $1600+.
  • Reo-Smart – Makes several height adjustable workstations, unfortunately they only go up to 37.8″ but the prices start around $570.
  • RightAngle – Has height adjustable desks, but fairly expensive.
  • SiS – Sells several adjustable height desks, unfortunately they are pretty expensive ($1500+).
  • Soma Ergonomics – Start at $1000+ and go up from there.
  • Steelcase – Sells the Airtouch, which is priced around $1500.
  • UpLift – Available via The Human Solution. Numerous different models available, the Uplift 445 starting at $749.
  • Beyond the Office Door – Seels the VertDesk, base is $549, once a top is added the price jumps to $689.
  • Wood Craft of Michigan.

Modify Existing Desk

  • Desktop Elevator – Fits onto existing desk, starts at $829.
  • AdjustDesk – These fit on an existing desk, starting at $499. Known as the “Kangaroo.”
  • Health Postures – Offers units that are placed on top of existing desk.
  • iSkelter – Upgrades for existing desks to become standing desks.
  • StorkStand – Mounts onto chair, single monitor, $199.
  • Upstanding – Mounts on a normal desk, is height adjustable, costs $200 for standard (one monitor) or $250 for double-wide (two monitor).

Considerations

  • Is electric better than crank? In my opinion, it may be better to get a crank unit (which is cheaper) as mechanical parts tend to last longer than electronic components. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a dead electronic table five years down the road, but I’d hope the manufacturing quality would allow a crank table to be usable twenty years later.
  • How high and how low does my desk need to go? Comfortable Computing has a great calculator that uses your height to determine how high your desk should be when sitting and when standing.

My Finalists

  • ModTable – There are cheaper options available, but this appears to be the lowest priced high-end height adjustable desk I could find. I’m interested in their $549 crank unit. The one downside I see to these units is their minimum height of 27.5″. According to Comfortable Computing when sitting I should be using a keyboard at 25″ – so in sitting, I won’t be ergonomically correct. I could fix this by affixing a keyboard try underneath the desk which would probably bring the level down 1-2″.
  • UpDesk – Another attractive option which offers a lower minimum height (26.5″, but still too high for me) and on the negative a lower maximum height (42.5″, which is enough for me). The unit is around $100 more expensive than the ModTable.
  • GeekDesk – I must admit a certain attraction to GeekDesk due to their popularity and their cool name…but the product is also solid. The cost is around $800, but the unit is electrically powered and it goes as low as 23 in. and as high as 49 in. – that seems about perfect to me for height minimum and maximum. On the downside, expect to pay $125 for S&H!

Conclusion

At this juncture I’m divided. I’d really like a hand-crank table (more reliability) but also think the min. and max. heights on the GeekDesk are the best. I’m leaning slightly towards ModTable b/c of the lower price and the hand-crank, but I’m still up in the air. What do you think? Are there other options I should be consulting? Other factors I should be considering?

Appendix A. Sore Feet/Legs

I’ve transitioned into the full-time pastorate and stand at my desk as often as possible (I have a no-name drafting table right now) and sometimes my feet hurt from doing so. Here are a few articles I found that address this issue that others may find helpful as well.

Appendix B. Random

Appendix C. My Setup Notes

  • For standing I currently use a height adjustable drafting table I picked up at a garage sale. It goes up to approximately 39″ in height (3.25′). It is 36″ wide (3′) and 24″ (2′) deep. It allows for adjusting the angle of the desk up or down, something most height adjustable desks do not.
  • On my standing desks I have two Fellows monitor mounts which add another 4″ to the height.
  • For sitting I currently use a small desk, it is approximately 29″ tall (2.4′). It is 45″ wide (3.75′) and 20″ deep (1.7′).
  • I’m apparently shrinking, I’m pretty sure I was once 5’8″, but remeasuring, I’m clocking in at 5’6″.
  • According to Computing Comfort’s calculations I should have my standing keyboard at a height of 40.5″ and the top of my screens at a height of 61.5″ – in other words, my keyboard is 1.5″ too low and my monitors are 2.5″ too low (after calculating in the height of my monitors at 17″).
  • According to Computing Comfort’s calculations I should have my sitting keyboard at a height of 25″ and the screens at a height of 46″ – in other words, my keyboard is 4″ too high and the monitors are exactly right.
  • Below I’ve compared my three finalists – the first two are crank, the third electric. Only the third goes low enough for me, but I can mount a keyboard under the first two to correct this issue. The prices below include S&H.
Manufacturer Model Min Max Width Depth Price Warranty
MultiTable ModTable Manual 27.5″ 47″ 48″ 24″ $539 1 yr. (2)
UpDesk CrankUp Small 26.5″ 42.5″ 48″ 30″ $798 5 yr.
GeekDesk v3 23″ 48.75″ 47.25″ 31.5″ $874 2 yr. (5)
  • The number in parentheses includes the longer warranty which covers only part of the desk (e.g. in GeekDesk, it does not cover the motor past two years).
  • It looks like a 3M Knob Adjustable Keyboard Tray would be ideal, it has high reviews on Amazon and clocks in at around $100.

Bibliography

  1. A Week with a Sit-Stand Desk.” Pandawhale. 1/28/12.
  2. Build an Adjustable Desk with Pipe and Klee Klamp.” Simplified Building Concepts.
  3. GeekDesk Max Review.” Gear Live. 8/31/12.
  4. How Can I Build a Wall Mounted Adjustable Height Desk?” DIY.StackExchange.
  5. How Do I Make a Height Adjustable Desk?” DIY.StackExchange.
  6. How Do I Make My Own Height Adjustable Desk?” Lifehacker. 1/26/12.
  7. How to Build an Adjustable Height Computer Desk for Under $100.” Tutorial Save. 11/21/10.
  8. Refold Cardboard Standing Desk Changes the Way You Work.” designboom. 10/7/14.
  9. Standing Desk.” Lowes Creative Ideas for Home and Garden.
  10. Aaron Couch. “10 Accessories Every Standing Desk Owner Should Have.” MakeUseOf. 12/30/13.
  11. Adam Dachis. “Build a DIY Wide, Adjustable Height IKEA Standing Desk on the Cheap.” Lifehacker. 1/21/11.
  12. Adam Epstein. “IKEA Has Created a Desk That Converts From Sitting to Standing Via a Simple Button.” Quartz, 11/24/14.
  13. Adam Clark Estes. “IKEA Sit/Stand Desk Review: I Can’t Believe How Much I Like This.” Gizmodo. 10/30/14.
  14. Alan Henry. “Five Best Standing Desks.” Lifehacker. 2/23/14.
  15. Alex E. Weaver. “My Week with a Standing Desk.” BostInno. 9/26/14.
  16. Alice Robb. “Yet Another Reason Why We Should All Stand At Work.” New Republic. 6/30/14.
  17. Ashlee Vance. “Stand Stand: A Portable Standing Desk for the People.” Businessweek. 10/1/14.
  18. Ben Brooks. “Jarvis Standing Desk.” The Brooks Review. 2/27/14.
  19. Ben Schiller. “We Took Ikea’s New Automatic, Adjustable Standing Desk For A Spin.” Fast Company, Coexist. 11/3/14.
  20. Brett & Kate McKay. “Becoming a Stand-Up Guy: The History, Benefits, and Use of Standing Desks.” The Art of Manliness. 7/5/11.
  21. Chris Gardner. “How to Make a DIY Adjustable Drafting Table from Any Desktop.” Curbly. 1/18/11.
  22. Chris Murphy. “Standing Desks: What I’ve Learned.” InformationWeek. 6/20/14.
  23. Cia Bernales. “My Year at a Standing Desk and Why I’ll Never Go Back.” Fast Company.  4/11/14.
  24. Core Jr. “Standing Desk Shootout: Humanscale Float Table.” Core77. 8/24/11.
  25. Dan Kois. “Sitting Is Bad for You. So I Stopped. For a Whole Month.” New York Magazine. 6/9/14.
  26. Daniel Engber. “Who Made That Standing Desk?” New York Times. 3/20/14.
  27. Darrell Etherington. “Press Fit Standing Desk Review: An Affordable Option with U.S. Manufacturing and Materials.” TechCrunch. 9/1/14.
  28. Dominic Smith. “The Literature of the Standing Desk.” The Millions. 5/15/14.
  29. Drake Bennett. “Kill Your Desk Chair – and Start Standing.” BusinessWeek. 6/28/12.
  30. Elizabeth Narins. “6 Ridiculously Simple Standing Desk Hacks.” Cosmopolitan. 8/13/14.
  31. Emily Oster. “I Stand Corrected About the Best Kind of Desk.” FiveThirtyEight. 5/21/14.
  32. Gina Trapini. “Why and How I Switched to a Standing Desk.” Smarterware. 1/16/11.
  33. Gregory Ferenstein. “Work Like Churchill-Ditch Your Office Chair and Embrace the Standing Desk.” The Daily Beast. 6/2/14.
  34. Gwynn Guilford. “There’s a Huge Hidden Downside to Standing Desks That No One Told Me About.” Quartz. 9/29/14.
  35. Heather Moore. “How to Use a Standing Desk.” Philly. 4/22/14.
  36. Holly Korbey. “How Standing Desks Can Help Students Focus in the Classroom.” KQED (Mind/Shift). 10/21/14.
  37. Jared Alexrod. “7 Standing Desks That Won’t Break the Bank.” Paste Magazine. 10/17/14.
  38. Jennifer Gosse. “Why An Adjustable Height Desk is Our #1 Health-Related Workhack for 2014.” Tracky. 1/15/14.
  39. Jessica Stillman. “What’s Healthier Than a Standing Desk?” Inc. 9/16/14.
  40. Jim Carlton. “Standing Desks Are on the Rise.” WSJ. 8/31/11.
  41. John Biggs. “Gift Guide: The UpDesk Standing Desk Video Review.” TechCrunch. 11/13/12.
  42. Joseph Stromberg. “Five Health Benefits of Standing Desks.” Smithsonian Magazine. 3/26/14.
  43. Josh Smith. “Standing Desk Guide: Measurements, Examples, and Benefits.” Notebooks.com. 5/3/11.
  44. Julie Carlson. “5 Favorites: Longevity-Promoting Standing Desks.” Remodelista. 5/15/14.
  45. Karyne Levy. “I Tried Out a Standing Desk For All of the Benefits – Here’s Why I Quit.” 6/22/14.
  46. Kate Taylor. “Get Up, Stand Up, For Your Life: Can Standing Desks Fight Sitting Disease?” Forbes. 8/2/12.
  47. Kathleen Pierce. “Many Employees Abandon Sitting While Working.” Boston Globe. 3/26/12.
  48. Kerry Butters. “A Standing Desk Might Not (Necessarily) Save Your Life.” sitepoint. 10/20/14.
  49. Kerry Flynn. “How to Make a Standing Desk for Under $200: MIT Grads Go Digital.” Forbes. 7/31/14.
  50. Kevin Michaluk. “Standing Desks – Why I Use One; Why You Should Too.” Crackberry. 2/28/12.
  51. Kristin Hohenadel. “A Mobile Standing Desk for Laptop Users on a Budget.” Slate (The Eye). 10/2/14.
  52. Lecia Bushak. “Standing Desks, Friend or Foe? What Happened When I Stood At Work For the Last 4 Months.” Medical Daily. 9/18/14.
  53. Lloyd Alter. “Are Standing Desks Healthier Than Sitting?” Treehugger. 2/25/10.
  54. M Neuhaus, GN Healy, DW Dunstan, N Owen, EG Eakin. “Workplace Sitting and Height-Adjustable Workstations: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” American Journal of Preventative Medicine, January 2014, 46(1), pp. 30-40.
  55. Matt Linderman. “Bootstrapped, Profitable, & Proud: GeekDesk.” 37Signals. 6/15/11.
  56. Mark Lukach. “Besting Standing Desks.” The Wirecutter.  5/29/12. (The article from Wired found here is a copy of this article.)
  57. Matthias Wandel. “Height Adjustable Computer Desk (my wheely desk).”
  58. Mikael Cho. “Why I Killed My Standing Desk.” Crew.
  59. Michael Desmond. “Five Questions with GeekDesk Founder Donovan McNutt on Standing Desks.” About.com.
  60. North Krimsly. “The Latest Height Stand-Up Desks.” High Integrity Design. 12/2/13.
  61. Peter Koch. “Stand-Up Guy: 5 Best Standing Desks.” Gear Patrol. 7/11/14.
  62. Phaedra Riley. “Standing Desk Shootout: Haworth Planes Height-Adjustable Table.” Core77. 8/16/11.
  63. Rain Noe. “‘Living With’ Product Review: The GeekDesk Truly Transforms the Way You Work.” Core77. 6/21/11.
  64. Ray Hu. “Standing Desk Shootout: Steelcase Airtouch Height-Adjustable Table.” Core77. 8/30/11.
  65. Simona Ganea. “10 IKEA Standing Desk Hacks With Ergonomic Appeal.” homedit. 8/5/14.
  66. Stephanie M. Lee. “Companies Take a Stand Against Sitting.” SFGate. 8/8/12.
  67. Stephen Searer. “7 Height-Adjustable Desks That Won’t Murder You.” Office Snapshots. 8/24/12.
  68. Steven Salzberg. “Does a Standing Desk Lengthen Your Lifespan?” Field of Science (Genomics). 9/28/14.
  69. Thorin Klosowski. “How Sitting All Day is Damaging Your Body and How You Can Counteract It.” Lifehacker. 1/26/12.
  70. Todd Wasserman. “Are You Sitting Down? Why a Stand-Up Desk Might Save Your Life.” Mashable. 4/22/11.
  71. Vicky Hallett. “Standing Desks Sit Well With More Employees.” The Washington Post. 5/20/14.

Toshiba, Kingston, and the Case of Useless RAM.

I’m an IT geek. IT flows through my veins – I couldn’t get rid of it if I wanted. I’m too old to be a digital native, but I’d like to think I’m pretty close.

I’m used to replacing my laptop every two years or so but I’ve been using the same laptop now since 2010. A Toshiba Tecra A11-S3540. It is a good machine boasting a powerful Intel Core i7 CPU, a dedicated 512 MB NVIDIA graphics adapter, 4 GB DDR3 RAM, gigabit ethernet, and 802.11n wireless. A while back I replaced the standard 7200 SATA hard drive with a 128 GB SSD – which made an incredible difference in system speed…but now, things are starting to drag again.

I’ve looked at purchasing a new system, but to get something just equivalent with what I currently have is fairly pricey, so I’m holding off as long as I can. There is really only one other upgrade I can make to stretch the life of this laptop – adding more RAM.

I’ve held off on buying the RAM for over a year – but finally decided that the decrease in productivity was costing me more than upgrading the RAM would cost.

I went on Toshiba’s site and looked up their memory recommendations. For this specific laptop model they recommended Kingston’s 4 GB DDR3 1333Mhz memory modules at $50 each.

Screenshot of Toshiba Direct Search Result Page

I shopped around a bit – seeing if I could find anyone else who was selling the memory for cheaper and double and triple checking whether it would work with this system. I supposed since it was the recommendation on Toshiba’s site it would, but I wanted to be sure.

I stumbled across a Kingston page which indicated what I was looking for was actually the KTT1066D3/4G but that it had been “replaced by” the KTT-S3B/4G.

Screenshot of Kingston Memory Page

To their credit, if I went through the System-Specific Memory portion of Kingston’s site and attempted to find my system, it wouldn’t appear as an option.

You can probably guess where this is going. I ordered the RAM from a seller off eBay. Damage was a little less than $110.

I (im)patiently waited for the memory to arrive and when it did I eagerly pulled the old 2 GB RAM chips and replaced them with the new 4 GB RAM chips. I powered it on, BIOS post went fine, but then Windows started to load. A message about a fatal error flashed on the screen and the system shut off…a few seconds later it powered itself back on and repeated the same steps…and so on.

I did some troubleshooting to make sure it wasn’t a bad RAM chip and eventually called Kingston, who informed me that the RAM wouldn’t work with my system. I’m not sure what “replaced by” means, but apparently it doesn’t mean “can be used instead of.”

The eBay seller offers a thirty day return policy, so I could return the chips, but over $10 was for S&H, I’d have to pay $10 for S&H, and then take a 15% hit for the restocking fee. In the end I’d get back around $75 out of the almost $110 I’d shelled out.

Moral of the story? I suppose there are two: (1) don’t rely too heavily on what Toshiba suggests are replacement parts for your system and (2) “replaced by” don’t mean what you think it mean, at least when it comes to Kingston…I’m not entirely sure what it does mean.

Light Therapy Lamps / Boxes.

I Blabber

I’ve had issues with sleep at least since I’ve been in high school. I wake up groggy,[1] feel tired throughout the day, experience overwhelming sleepiness at times throughout the day, and then have insomnia at night. Yes, it is as much fun as it sounds! 😛

Someone is struggling with insomnia. The image is thanks to the generosity of Jacob Stewart who placed the image under a Creative Commons license.
Someone is struggling with insomnia. The image is thanks to the generosity of Jacob Stewart who placed the image under a Creative Commons license.

In 2011-2012 I tried to get things figured out, went in for a sleep study, all that sort of good stuff, but came away with nothing conclusive – other than that I didn’t have sleep apnea (I didn’t think I did).

For the last two years I’ve lived with it – especially since numerous other health issues took precedence…but this year I’ve experienced significant relief from my other health issues[2] and sleep remains my greatest remaining obstacle…and probably a contributor to my other remaining health issues.

I saw a sleep specialist yesterday (Monday, 4/2). It went well. She did a thorough job and I felt like the office was run professionally. It did set me back $100 for the co-pay, which was painful…but I survived.

They scheduled me for a sleep study tonight which would then be continued tomorrow with a six hour daytime nap study…but this morning I was informed that they had spoken with my insurance company and the co-pay would be $1200. Not exactly what I was looking for, so we canceled the study for the time being.

Getting Down to Business

NatureBright SunTouch Plus Light and Ion Therapy Lamp
NatureBright SunTouch Plus Light and Ion Therapy Lamp

Honestly, if I could sleep at night and be wakeful during the day, $1200 would be a no-brainer…but there isn’t a guarantee that the sleep study will demonstrate anything…and it seems to me that the treatments for a number of sleep disorders are fairly similar – namely (a) stimulant medications, (b) light therapy, (c) melatonin supplementation, and/or (d) behavioral changes.

I’m already on (a) and this exacerbates my OCD symptoms…so I don’t really want to increase the dosage.

I’ve already been told about (d) innumerable times and have made significant modifications to my sleep hygiene…I don’t see room for much more improvement on this front.

Philips BLU Light Therapy Device
Philips BLU Light Therapy Device

Which leaves (b) and (c). I’ve used (c) at various times without significant positive effect, though my more recent research has raised some new elements regarding timing of dosing which I may try…but (b) has always fascinated me, so I’m going to pursue that first.

I searched Amazon for light therapy “lamps” or “boxes” and I eliminated all that lacked a four star or greater rating. There were several different companies represented in these results which had a fair slew of reviews: Verilux, Philips, NatureBright, Omega, and Sphere Gadget Technologies.

I eliminated Omega and Sphere Gadget Technologies b/c I refuse to buy products from companies that don’t have websites – especially companies selling products of this sort. Sorry folks.

Making a Decision

This left Verilux, Philips, and NatureBright. You can see a comparison chart I made of the various models offered by these companies here.

HappyLight Liberty Natural Spectrum Lamp
HappyLight Liberty Natural Spectrum Lamp

NatureBright had one unit that ranked high (4.5 stars) and Verilux had two, whereas all the Philips units where rated well (4 stars) but not high.

The most popular product out of those mentioned was the NatureBright SunTouch Plus Light and Ion Therapy Lamp which had 1,819 ratings – no one else came close, one of Philips trailing fare behind at 747 ratings.

The NatureBright products, in spite being so highly rated where also the lowest priced – so I bought (and am awaiting delivery of) the above mentioned unit.

As one can see on the comparison chart there are a few features this unit may lack (I won’t be sure until I get my hands on it) that some of the other units included – a rechargeable battery (this isn’t important to me), a dimmer (this is important), an alarm clock (not important). But with a 30 day return policy – I figure I can give it a try and always return it and replace it with another unit if I’m not happy…

My second choice at this point is probably the Verilux HappyLight Liberty Natural Spectrum lamp – the price is in the middle of the range across manufacturers, it has the 4.5 rating, and most importantly in comparison to the Philips products – the lamp is replaceable. Granted, the lamps should last for twenty-five or fifty years, but I still prefer to have the option to replace them.

 

  1. [1]Used to be depressed, which would dissipate 10 minutes into a shower…but that has gone away, now it is just groggy.
  2. [2]When you operate normally at say 40% health and you experience a boost to say 75% health, you still aren’t ‘healthy’ but it sure feels a heck of a lot better. :) Better enough that I can ‘live’ with the nuisances of the remaining 25%…

I Spent Too Much Time Researching Vacuums.

I can’t remember when but a few years back I bought a Hoover Nano-Lite[1] from Target. It has served me extremely well but recently broke down and died. I needed a new vacuum – and I like to research before I make these sorts of purchases. Not so much to save money as to find a really solid product. I don’t mind paying a little more, I do mind products and services that waste my time.

The Bissell CleanView 9595.
The Bissell CleanView 9595.

The first thing I did was see if the Hoover Nano-Lite was still available (it isn’t). My next step was to hop on over to Target and browse through their selection of vacuums. Why Target? Because Target tends to offer a decent range of the most popular products representative of the market as a whole – yet doesn’t offer anything. If I go onto Amazon I will give up researching – there are simply too many choices, so Target is a good way to narrow things down (and this is where I think places like Target still have a lead over Amazon).

Even using Target I ended up with a fairly vast list of potential vacuums. So I narrowed it down by seeing the features that the Nano-Lite had that I really liked and then finding the models that best matched or exceeded these features at a reasonable price point.[2]

In the end I came down to two models – the Bissell CleanView 9595 and the Hoover Sprint UH20040. I’ve included a table below comparing the two models.

 

Company Name Model Price Roller Tools Cord Hose Bag Washable
Filter
Capacity Weight Warranty Path Rated Handheld Amps
Hoover Nano-Lite U244-0900 $50 Y Y 20′ ? N Y ? 11 1 11″ N 10
Bissell CleanView 9595 $75 Y Y 25’ 6’ N Y 1.7 L 15.1 2 ? 4.5 N 10
Hoover Sprint UH20040 $53 Y Y 23’ 7’ N Y ? 12.5 1 12″ 4 N 10

The Bissell was slightly more expensive but had a 4.5 rating on Target as opposed to the Hoovers 4, its cord was 2′ longer than the Hoover, and it came with a 2 year warranty. On the other hand, the Hoover was less expensive, had a 1′ longer hose, and weighed 2.6 lbs less.

The Hoover Sprint QuickVac UH20040
The Hoover Sprint QuickVac UH20040

In the end I decided to go with the Sprint primarily because of the lower weight (though still higher than the Nano-Lite). For me, weight had been one of the biggest factors in buying the Nano-Lite – I really love a vacuum I can easily maneuver/carry. I’m also a sucker for system monitoring (where the device monitors its own health)…oh, and the lower price didn’t hurt.

The vacuum should arrive in the mail tomorrow and I’ll be sure to give an update to everyone if I decide I made a mistake. Before I close this post let me just highlight a few items about vacuums generally you might want to know:

  • Not all vacuums have roller bars. I saw several nice, less-expensive vacuums but they didn’t have roller bars. These work on hard floors but really aren’t great on carpet.
  • By “tools” I mean essentially the detachable hose – some of the less-expensive models, especially stick vacuums don’t have a detachable hose – which to me is silly. Why would I want a tiny vacuum if in order to clean I now need to use two devices?
  • Some vacuums are bagless (like all three above) while others have bags. I’m torn over which is better. The bagless are less expensive to maintain (no need to buy more bags) but I’m not a big fan of the way dust sprouts everywhere when you dump them out.
  • A washable filter is nice, but you probably aren’t talking about a HEPA quality filter. I made this trade-off, but it isn’t one everyone will want to make. If you have allergies you may want to pay more to get a true HEPA filter…just remember these will also cost more to replace.
  • Capacity is important. These lite little vacuums are great for mobility, but their waste area isn’t huge. If you are coming from a more traditional vacuum, I’d guess that the waste disposal is 1/3rd the size on one of these little guys. I never found this to be problematic (and I had four cats), but you may.
  • By “path” I mean how wide the area that sucks up waste is on the vacuum. This is important to note. Some vacuums have much smaller sucking areas – such as 8″. This means that you’ll have to do more passes to cover the entirety of a room. On the other hand, if the path is too wide it will make it difficult to fit into narrow areas and require more moving of furniture.
  • You’ll also notice that none of these units are handheld. One of the nice features of the stick vacuums (which didn’t usually have tools) was that they detached to become handheld units. I decided that this wasn’t as important as the tools…though I’d really like to see an affordable unit combine these two aspects.
  • Finally, you’ll note that the ampage on these units is 10 amps each. The amps are the power of the motor. Some of the smaller, cheaper vacuums have significantly lower ampage – like 1.25-2 amps. I haven’t used a unit with this little ampage but I have a hard time believing the motor will be able to suck up waste effectively with so little power behind it.

Here is hoping that my research may make someone else’s research a little less extensive. 🙂

  1. [1]For those who care, Model # was U2440-900.
  2. [2]A reasonable price point is always a compromise between feature set and quality versus cost for the feature set and quality. For example, one may only pay a few dollars extra to move from a flaky product to a good product, and a few more to move to a really good product – to move into the top echelon of great products there is a huge price premium – and so the price per feature/increase in quality becomes significantly greater than at lower levels.

Five Year Longevity Award: Stamina 15-0200 InTone Recumbent/Stationary Folding Bike.

I’ve decided to start a new series of blog posts – the longevity awards. This will look at the items I have reviewed in the past and am still using today. The first item is one of the oldest – I’ve had it for over five years – the Stamina InTone Folding Recumbent (Stationary) Bike.

This is the InStamina 15-0201 (the newer version) unfolded and ready for use.
This is the InTone 15-0201 (the newer version) unfolded and ready for use.

I don’t like exercising, I don’t like going to gyms – but I do want to be healthy, agile, and strong (not bulky, just capable). I had found while running cross country that I enjoyed riding stationary bikes if I could watch something (TV/movie) at the same time…but I still didn’t want to waste time going to a gym.

I began researching for a stationary bike that one could keep at home, was reasonably affordable, and wouldn’t take up a lot of space – that is when I stumbled on the 15-0200, and I’ve been using it ever since – except for a period of time when health problems made this impossible.

When I bought the unit in October of 2007 off Amazon it was under $140, but after paying S&H it was almost $200. Now on Amazon you can get the newer model (which as far as I can tell doesn’t have any improvements over the previous one, just a few slight differences in cosmetic design) for $200 if you have Prime – so it is pretty much a wash on price.

The unit has held up over years of use. The seat is beginning to lose some of its covering, the display is irreparably grimey and every once in a while I need to tighten up some of the bolts – but really can’t complain.

This is the InStamina 15-0201 folded up and ready to place in a corner.
This is the InTone 15-0201 folded up and ready to place in a corner.

If you hate exercising, I recommend the stationary bike + movies/TV option, or the stationary bike + reading option. If you love exercising but don’t want to have to set aside a whole room as a gym or have bulky equipment filling up your living room – the Stamina is a good choice…in fact, I haven’t really found many other options out there – let me know if you do!

I’m now trying to combine my stationary bike exercises with some bodyweight exercises (based off the 7 Minute Scientific workout) as well as a short but helpful stretching routine. It is amazing how painful I find exercise – even doing the 7 minutes drives me nuts, but want to do something for the upper body (right now, crunches and push ups).

Ohh, and while I’m at it, the one thing I would like to see Stamina improve is the LCD display – preferably something that has wireless connectivity and can integrate with other fitness devices/sites like FitBit.

Yes, My Toothbrushes Come in the Mail By Subscription.

Back in September 2013 I wrote about DollarShaveClub which delivers inexpensive and quality razors to your home on a recurring basis for an affordable subscription fee. Not surprisingly, others have jumped on the subscription bandwagon – one of them being ToothbrushSubscriptions – not quite as innovative a name as DollarShaveClub – but it gets the job done.

This is the Economy toothbrush from ToothbrushSubscriptions that I received today.
This is the Economy toothbrush from ToothbrushSubscriptions that I received today.

Do we really need a subscription program for our toothbrushes? Am I really too lazy to pick up a toothbrush at the grocery story? The answer to both is – no. I go grocery shopping semi-frequently, that is once every one or two weeks. I could pick up a toothbrush from the grocery store – but it is more convenient to have it delivered to my doorstep – and its not like I’m paying a premium for the service!

See, ToothbrushSubscriptions discovered a real niche. Everyone wants their toothbrush to be workable (yet oftentimes they get destroyed and we continue to use them b/c we forget to pick up another) and also cleanish (yet we oftentimes use them forever, forgetting to purchase another).

How often do we need to replace our toothbrushes? I don’t know…but every time I see those pictures of microscopic bacteria swarming all over everything, it makes me want to buy a new toothbrush. ToothbrushSubscriptions sends me one automatically every three months for $1 – flat. That means over a year’s time I receive four toothbrushes – which remind me to replace the one I have been using each time they arrive – and it costs me a grand total of $4.

Granted, I am using the Economy Toothbrush (their least expensive) and one could get a baby toothbrush for $2 or a luxury toothbrush for $3 or even the American Dental Association Approved Advantage toothbrush for $5. But even if you go all out and get the $5 ADA toothbrush, you still are spending $20 a year – not too shabby in the larger picture.[1] :P[/ref]

This is the ADA approved toothbrush from ToothbrushSubscriptions I'm throwing away.
This is the ADA approved toothbrush from ToothbrushSubscriptions I’m throwing away.

The packaging is pretty primitive – not nearly as attractive as DollarShaveClubs’ packaging. Maybe that is why its DollarShaveClub and ToothbrushSubscriptions – but I expect with time and growth the packaging will improve.

There isn’t the same humor either – you won’t find funny YouTube videos and you don’t receive humorous business type cards in most packages…but hey, its toothbrushes and there is less margin on toothbrushes (I’d imagine) than on razors.

Now the site isn’t amazing either. For the life of me I can’t figure out how to login to my account. I can create an account (I did) but where is the login page?!? I don’t know. Hopefully this will be remedied soon – it is a simple fix, adding a link to the page (which I am sure exists, I just don’t know where).

I’d also like to see ToothbrushSubscriptions diversify their product portfolio – I’d love to get my toothpaste and floss shipped directly to me. They do carry floss – but its the old-fashioned string kind instead of the new plastic disposables which are so much easier to use. They could also add mouthwash – that’d be nice – but I know its a liquid and a bit more difficult to mail.

Where ToothbrushSubscriptions could run into problems is if DollarShaveClub decides to diversify its portfolio to include toothbrushes – and I wouldn’t be surprised if they did. That said, as loon as ToothbrushSubscriptions offers a reasonable price, a reasonable product, and reasonable service – I wouldn’t see any need to switch over to DollarShaveClub for my toothbrushes even if they began offering them.

So, go check them out.

  1. [2]
  2. [1]How could you ever justify spending $60 yearly on toothbrushes, Dave? First off, I don’t. Secondly, I don’t have cable – so there.[2]Aka, I can buy my gadgets with the money most folks spend on their cable bills!

Trying to Make Sense of Cat Food.

Goodness gracious, there are like a billion different cat foods out there – it is so overwhelming! Even just by a single company there seems to be endless variations! I had recently been fairly happy with the Goodlife Recipe with Chicken Food for Indoor Cats (14 lbs) but then it shot up to the outrageous price of $50+. Maybe this is only a temporary issue with Amazon’s supply – but for now, with a doubling in price, there is no way I’m buying it.

So, here I am, yet again looking for cat food. I have four cats – one that has an eating disorder and will continue eating till she vomits, continuing eat, vomit, and repeat forever. Two of the other cats have sensitive stomachs and a lot of cat food doesn’t seem to agree with them.

I’ve spent a little while on Amazon and here is what I’ve narrowed my options down to…I’ll probably end up trying a few before I find one that works well with my sensitive cats (the only way to deal with the eating disordered one is portion control) and this will give me a list to come back to and hopefully help others who are trying to decide on a cat food narrow down their selections from the hundreds of options available.

I’ve selected the foods based on brand name, customer reviews, price, weight, ingredients, and so on.

Budget Options

Organic Options

I’m going to try Hill’s Ideal Balance Natural Chick and Brown Rice Recipe first. The price is reasonable, and becomes more reasonable with Subscribe & Save and I like the fact that in addition to being all-natural it doesn’t contain any corn, wheat, or soy. We’ll see how it goes…

Postable Expands to Holiday Cards

I wrote a while back about a nifty new company (Postable) that offered beautiful and humorous thank you cards at reasonable prices – which they mailed directly to your desired recipient with your message printed in a handwritten font (which was difficult, but not impossible to distinguish from real handwriting).

Recently I received an email from Postable informing me that they had significantly expanded their product line. From only carrying generic thank you cards they’ve expanded into specific niches – baby, graduation, and religious. They’ve also added holiday cards (Christmas, Thanksgiving, Groundhog Day (?!), Hanukkah, Chinese New Year, New Year, and Valentine’s Day), and cards for everyday occasions (congratulations, get well, birthday, moving, apologies). Wow! Now I don’t ever have to write a card again!

Okay, so maybe I’ll still need to write some cards – but point is – this is pretty exciting. In the email I received Postable provided a 20% off coupon for Valentine’s Day cards. The coupon code is LUVCARDS.

Now guys, I may be a dunce when it comes to being romantic – but even I know that one of the quickest ways to end up in the dog house is to give that special someone a printed Valentine’s Day card (errr…make that any card!)…So use this for those you care about – but don’t blame me if you find yourself in hot water if you choose to give a printed Valentine’s Day card to her.

Here are a few of my favorites designs for Valentine’s Day from Postable’s site (my horribly corny sense of humor may surface…):

 

Love Note by Silas Tom.
Love Note by Silas Tom. Haha. Get it? I’m drawn to you.
I'm Head Over Heels by Old Tom Foolery
I’m Head Over Heels by Old Tom Foolery

 

I Would Get Really Hurt for You by Postable
I Would Get Really Hurt for You by Postable
I Want You Luchador by Viva Greetings
I Want You Luchador by Viva Greetings. This is the sort of card I would give to male friends…I think it is the first Valentine’s Day card I’ve ever thought I would give to a male friend…Giving it to a female would probably end in incarceration.
I Love You by Old Tom Foolery
I Love You by Old Tom Foolery
Be Mine by Old Tom Foolery
Be Mine by Old Tom Foolery. This must have been made with Overly Attached Girlfriend in mind.
A Dozen Roses Just For You by Postable
A Dozen Roses Just For You by Postable. I don’t know who half of these people are – but I thought it was funny…especially giving away Pete and Charlie Rose!