50 Psychology Classics

I just finished Tom Butler-Bowdon’s 50 Psychology Classics which summarizes fifty of the most important books written on psychology.

Tom is an amazing guy who has written multiple books along these lines including similar volumes on Self-Help, Success, Spiritual, Prosperity, and Politics Classics.

In addition, Tom makes many of the summaries from his various books available on his website. I’ll be linking out to a few below.

 

Front Cover of 50 Psychology ClassicsI love these books because they provide a great way to get an overview of the literature. It isn’t meant to be the end, rather it is a beginning. A place to become familiar with the “big ideas” and determine which ideas one really needs to dive into more deeply.

Here are the volumes I found most interesting in this book. I’ve marked those which I really want to read with an *.

  1. Understanding Human Nature by Alfred Adler.
  2. Games People Play by Eric Berne.*
  3. The Female Brain by Louann Brizendine.
  4. Feeling Good by David Burns.* (I’ve already read this one, see OCD Dave for my summary of its contents).
  5. A Guide to Rational Living by Albert Ellis & Robert A. Harper.
  6. My Voice Will Go With You: The Teaching Tales of Milton Erickson by Sidney Rosen.*
  7. Young Man Luther by Erik Erikson.
  8. The Will to Meaning by Viktor Frankl.
  9. Working with Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman.
  10. The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work by John M. Gottman.* (I’ve read this one as well)
  11. I’m OK–You’re OK by Thomas A. Harris.
  12. The True Believer by Eric Hoffer.
  13. The Farther Reaches of Human Nature by Abraham Maslow.*
  14. Brainsex by Anne Moir and David Jessel.*
  15. Gestalt Therapy by Fritz Perls.
  16. On Becoming a Person by Carl Rogers.
  17. Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman.
  18. Beyond Freedom and Dignity by B.F. Skinner.
  19. Difficult Conversations by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen.*
  20. Darkness Visible by William Styron.* (I’ve read this one as well)
  21. The Origin of Everyday Moods by Robert E. Thayer.

Note: I did not select the most important works out of those listen in Tom’s book, rather I chose those that interested me. There were a number that would probably be considered more fundamental than some of those listed above but with which I either lack interest or else I am already familiar through other sources with.

At the end of the book Tom offers a concise list of fifty more classics, of those I am most interested in:

Geeking Out: I Love Cloud9!

Introduction

LOVE Cloud9.

For the unGeeky

Me: Cloud9 is a development environment.

You: Great, that was singularly unhelpful.

Me: A development environment is the way one configures one’s computer to run the various applications used in programming (writing an application).

You: And this is so great because?

Me: Because setting up a development environment can be time consuming. There are usually a number of different applications you need to install and configuration changes that need to be made before the development environment is ready to use. For example, if you want to develop a PHP application (Wikipedia and WordPress are built on this) you’ll need an application to write code in as well as a web server to run the application. Most likely you’ll also need a database server to store all the data your PHP application works with.

In addition, programming can be messy and you may mess up your development environment and want to reinstall your Operating System (e.g. Windows, Mac OS X, Linux) – in which case you’ll have to do a bunch of work all over again to setup your development environment.

Personally, I like to have separate “workspaces” (aka development environments) for different projects. I may be writing a WordPress plugin in one development environment, experimenting with Node.js (currently one of the “hot” technologies), and have another project or two floating around. It helps me to keep things organized when my “workspace” only has the files related to the project I’m working on currently – and if I make any changes to configurations (e.g. to the web server) they will only effect this one project and not any other projects I am working on.

If you are looking to try out programming I’d recommend codeacademy and once you’ve got the swing of things, use Cloud9.

For the Geeky

Cloud9 provides a dockerized instance of Ubuntu preconfigured for development and a web-based IDE. It has prebuilt configurations for Node.js, LAMP, Python/Django, Ruby, C++, WordPress, Meteor, and HTML5.

Cloud9 IDE Screenshot
Screenshot from the Cloud9 IDE. Don’t be scared, you don’t have to have this many windows open at once.

For free you can create multiple workspaces, each workspace having 1 CPU, 512 MB of RAM, and 1 GB of HDD.

The IDE includes code completion, a JS/Node.js debugger, and a number of other features you can read about on their site.

It integrates seamlessly with Github and Bitbucket, allows you to share workspaces with others, provides a publicly accessible URL (if desired) so you can show off your application, and so on.

Looking to do a little WordPress development? You can have a workspace setup in under five minutes!

Ohh, and did I mention that the Code9 IDE is available via GitHub?

Mom’s Night Out (Movie Review, PG)

There are things I review on my blog that I think everyone will love and then there are things I post here that I think some people will love…this one is for the some people, not everybody. (It has a 5.4/10 on IMDb but only 18% on Rotten Tomatoes.)

Mom's Night Our

I love slapstick comedy (think Home Alone, Baby’s Day Out, etc.) but there is very little of it being produced these days (if you are aware of some good ones I should be watching – let me know!). Mom’s Night Out falls into this category. I laughed so hard I almost cried. Sheila, my mom, and two of my sisters (Faith and Mary) were all watching it with me, I don’t think any of them enjoyed it quite as much as I did…though they may have enjoyed it more because of my near-tears laughing antics.

Mom’s Night Out is a Christian movie in the sense that it was made by Christians, but it is not a Christian movie in the sense of proselytizing. This film is funny and heart-warming and its take-away is a bit over-the-top, but hey, don’t most comedies have one of these at the end anyways?

Okay, now on to some geeky stuff I like to share and probably nobody reads… :-)

Actors

I always like to see who they were able to line up for a movie and what they were in before…this film has some fairly well-known talent including Sarah Drew, Sean Astin, Patricia Heaton, and David Hunt.

There are also several significant actors from the Christian film industry – which are likely known by those who watch these films and not by the larger world. These include: Andrea Logan White, Alex Kendrick, Jason Burkey, and Kevin Downes.